Get Healthy with Dr Carrot

21 07 2011

TV’s Dr Christian Jessen and the British Carrot Growers’ Association have collaborated on an informative yet fun leaflet that is now downloadable from www.britishcarrots.co.uk.  The Get Healthy with Dr Carrot leaflet is part of a year-long campaign by the nation’s carrot growers and Dr Christian to reiterate the words of wisdom uttered by Dr Carrot, a cartoon character from World War II.  Dr Carrot was part of an educational programme by the Ministry of Food to show people how to eat healthily during rationing but his words of advice are as valid today as they were 60 years ago and the leaflet is designed to communicate them to the younger generation.

Photo credit: The Imperial War Museum

“Dr. Carrot was a well loved character who promoted healthy-eating messages to keep the nation fit during the dark days of war,” says Dr. Christian.  “I’m delighted to be revisiting his advice on behalf of the British Carrot Growers’ Association.  Together we’ll get Britain healthy!”

The Get Healthy with Dr Carrot leaflet explains in a child friendly way just how important carrots are in our diets in particular the role that beta-carotene plays.  This is an antioxidant that occurs in high levels in carrots and which creates Vitamin A in the body.  This vitamin is vital for good eyesight, immunity, healthy hair and skin and ensuring good growth and strong bones and teeth.   As Dr Christian explains: “Research* has shown that many of this country’s youngsters and indeed adults have lower levels of vitamin A intakes than is ideally necessary.   But an 80g serving of cooked carrot – that’s just half a medium sized carrot – contains more than twice the recommended daily amount of vitamin A equivalent needed by adults.  It really couldn’t be easier to eat yourself healthier with carrots.”

The leaflet also looks into the fascinating history of carrots, which believe it or not were originally purple.  They only turned the more familiar orange colour in the 15th century when carrots were developed by Dutch growers in honour of their royal family who were from the ‘House of Orange’.

Perfect fodder for school quizzes, the leaflet contains some fun, interesting facts about carrots.  Do you know, for example, how many carrots are bought in the UK every weekend?  Or why carrots are ‘put to bed’ in winter and harvested at midnight at the start of the new season in June?  For the answers visit www.britishcarrots.co.uk!

Carrots are incredibly versatile and can be eaten raw or cooked.  During the Second World War carrots were promoted as a replacement for sugar in many recipes due to their natural sweetness which probably explains their popularity with children.   If, as a mum though, you still struggle to think of ways to get your kids to eat more carrots, the Get Healthy with Dr Carrot leaflet can give some top tips to help make it happen eg mix mashed carrots with mashed potato and use to top cottage pie or fish pie.

Another sure-fire way to get children to eat better is to get them involved in cooking and the leaflet provides some simple recipes that youngsters should find easy to make and which have been developed by Dr Christian for that ‘celebrity flair and kudos’.

Dr Christian adds: “There’s so much to say about carrots.  They’re low in calories, low in fat and saturates, naturally low in salt but high in fibre making them the perfect snack to crunch on when you’re watching your weight or that of your children.  The beta-carotene, when converted into Vitamin A, is an important nutrient for eye health – a lack of it can cause blindness – and because beta-carotene is an important antioxidant, eating carrots helps to keep your skin healthy and elastic.”

To find out more about the wonder of carrots and to download the Get Healthy with Dr Carrot leaflet visit www.britishcarrots.co.uk.

*The research to which Dr. Christian refers is the National Diet and Nutrition Survey of Young People¹ that revealed that 13 per cent of 11-14 year old boys and 20 per cent of 11-14 year old girls have vitamin A intakes below the minimum amount needed for good health.  This is also true of 16 per cent of men and 19 per cent of women aged between 19 and 24².

References:

¹  National Diet and Nutrition Survey:  Young People Aged 4-18 Years. 2000.
² National Diet and Nutrition Survey: Adults Aged 19-64 Years. Volume 2, 2003

Content provided by Mustard Communications.





In season in December, recipes and a few eco goodies!

10 12 2010

December is getting off to a white start this year, with widespread snow and bitterly cold temperatures.  Thankfully it’s also the festive season; a time of goodwill, good company and good food, so there is plenty to look forward to!

In this blog entry we’ve highlighted kale, including scrummy recipes such as Spicy Kale with Chickpeas and Kale & Roquefort Parcels.  We’ve also included two recipes that mix apples and celeriac (read on to find out more), and we have a special soup section.

Enjoy the blog and we wish you all a very merry, festive time!

The VegBox Recipes Team

PS. This recipe for Mushroom and Winter Veg Pie should not be missed.  It’s a perfect winter warmer that will turn whatever root veg you have into a divine treat!

In Season in December

As well as marking the start of winter, December is of course the festive season, and the way things are going you would be forgiven for thinking that here in the UK, it might be a white one!   So what can you expect in your veg box?  Forced Rhubarb and Purple Sprouting Broccoli is coming in, and plenty is still in season including: Beetroot, Celeriac, Kale, Pototoes & Swede.

Click through for the full list.

Veggie-in-the-Spotlight: Kale

Kale is a great source of Vitamins C, A and B6. It’s also packed with antioxidants, which are vital for a healthy immune system.  It’s in season over the winter, which makes it a useful ingredient in the vegetable box.  It’s strong flavour requires careful cooking, so it’s worth reading how to use it and checking out the recipes, to make sure you enjoy it.

Read more about this ingredient.

Try these recipes:

Celeriac & Apples!

And what about putting celeriac and apples together? Try these recipes:

Wholesome, Warming Soups

With the temperatures as they are, here in the office we have been bringing in soup to have for lunch, to warm our cockles and help power us through the afternoon.  Here are some of our favourite recipes which we think you will love too:

Ooffoo Community

These fabulous articles were uploaded to our sister site, Ooffoo, by community members:

Tips for Wormeries, by Maddy

…BEDDING – Add some additional bedding to your wormery such as shredded paper, scrunched up newspaper and/or a moisture mat as this can help to add some “insulation” and keep your worms a little warmer over the winter…

Read the full article.

The Joy of Mess, by Kerryb

…it isn’t just laziness or the comfort of soft furnishings and central heating that keep me inside.  It is not because I choose to neglect my garden, it is because I choose not to interfere.  This is armchair gardening at its best.  With a cup of tea and biscuit by my side, I sit back on my comfortable settee and watch, reaping the rewards of my negligence…

Read the full article

Marketplace Goodies

 Product image

Scented Drawer Sachets

Fair trade. Perfect for keeping drawers smelling sweet.

£10.50


 Product image

Flower Embroidered Jacket

Keep the cold out this winter.

£160.00


 Product image

Long Socks

Warm and cosy socks knitted from recycled yarn.

£22.00


 Product image

Sustainable Gift Wrap

Sustainable wrapping kit using recycled material.

£10.00


 Product image

Garden Sign

An amusing sign that makes the perfect gift for a green fingered loved one.

£4.99


 Product image

Gardening Book

Organise your gardening year and make the most of your produce.

£19.50





June’s First Fruit-in-the-Spotlight: Apricot

6 05 2009

all about apricots

When they’re in season, how to store them and a brand new summer sorbet recipe

Plus why not to chew on the kernels, what on earth they’ve got to do with Henry VIII, and the (possibly!) secret to a long life!

Read on for an All-About-Apricots kind of an article!





June’s First Veggie-in-the-Spotlight: Broad Beans

6 05 2009
brand new recipe just for you!

brand new recipe just for you!

Broad beans are also known as fava beans (eek, memories of Hannibal Lecter!).

In the UK, we usually use them fresh, but they can also be dried and then used as pulses. They are one of the most common garden vegetables in the UK. You can eat them whole, podded or skinned, depending on their age and size, and they are SO easy to grow, yielding beautiful purplish and white flowers into the bargain!

However, often there are gluts of them, and “our survey said” that lots of folks feel a bit stumped by how to use them.

Read on for a little un-stump-ing, and for the brand new broad bean recipe we’ve  been given by our lovely friends over at Octopus Books, who recently published “The Seasoned Vegetarian” by Simon Rimmer.